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15 Books Everyone Claims They Read but Haven’t

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    Reading Books Is a Great Hobby Which Makes You Smarter. Find Out the Books That People Claim They Have Read, but Haven’t.

    Aluxers, between the writer, the editor, and the voice-over artist for the video version of this article, we’ve read most of these books, but that’s between 3 of us and we can’t even tick all of them!

    We’ve created this list to see which of these you claim to have read, but genuinely haven’t. Here are 15 Books Everyone Claims They Read but Haven’t.

    Welcome to Alux.com – the place where future billionaires come to get inspired. If you’re not subscribed yet, you’re missing out.

    Reading this long boring article may be harder than reading some of these books. Switch over to the video version of this article:

    With that out of the way, let’s move to the first book on our list.

    1

    The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

    This book has been around since 1979 and it’s one of those books that most of us have sitting in our bookshelf, but just haven’t gotten around to reading. You’ve probably threatened to read it a few times, but that just hasn’t materialized.

    The book has an inch thick of dust covering it and the hitchhiker’s grandchildren are picking up their own hitchhikers.

    Right, so in case you thought we hadn’t read it because of that description… you’d be wrong. But if you thought we were speaking the truth, then you clearly haven’t read the book yourself.

    2

    Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

    It’s a title we’re all familiar with, but whether we’ve actually read the book, is open to debate.  It’s one of those books that are a prescribed read at school, and Aluxers, you know how it goes – you read it under duress, if at all.

    The book was written between 1860 and 1861 and you might think that the content is not relevant today, but you’d be surprised at just how relevant the book still is.

    A line that is still pertinent, is “Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There’s no better rule.”

    It’s worth a read Aluxers.

    It’s also worth subscribing to our channel, so don’t forget to do that right now.

    3

    The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

    If a book has been turned into a movie, and you haven’t yet read the book… then watching the movie first is not the best option. You need to make a make a dash and get a copy of the book, read it and then watch the movie.

    Otherwise, let’s be honest, you’ll never read the book and as we know, movies aren’t able to 100% accurately depict everything that the book holds inside.

    This story is beautiful and although it’s classified as a children’s book, it’s more than that. It looks at themes like loneliness, friendship, love, and loss.

    The movie is brilliantly done, but the pleasure you’ll get from turning the pages of this book, even as an adult, are endless.

    4

    Animal Farm by George Orwell

    Aluxers, if a book has been banned in certain parts of the world, you can be sure it holds a rather unique perspective on a situation.

    Such is the case with this book by George Orwell. We’ve all heard about the book, and maybe know the gist of the story – but why would it be banned? What is so odd about a group of farm animals, led by a pig named Napoleon, trying to create a free and equal society for themselves?

    You’re only going to really understand once you’ve finished reading the story.

    As reported by birmingham.gov.uk, “The book was misunderstood and was seen as being critical of all forms of socialism, rather than specifically Stalinist communism.” The book is banned in schools in the UAE.

    5

    The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

    This book was written in 2 weeks, and if you dedicated yourself to reading a bit each day, you could finish it in 2 weeks too… but most people haven’t.

    It’s a shame, because this book is a reflection of what you wish for in life, and that if you want something badly enough, work hard enough to achieve that goal, then ultimately the universe conspires to help you achieve it.

    It’s the kind of book that you always find at a garage or yard sale and you could pick it up for next to nothing.  

    Buy it next time you see it and dedicate a short space of time to reading it… it’s worth it.

    6

    Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

    Every year or so, you’ll come across lists like “BBC’s Top 100 Books You Need to Read Before You Die,” or the “BBC Book List Challenge.”

    These challenges are great fun. You can print the list and have a read-off with your partner or bestie. Tick the books as you’ve read them.

    One book that always lands up on the list is Catch-22 by Joseph Heller. Time, Newsweek, the Modern Library, and the London Observer have all classified this book as one of the “best novels” of all time, according to goodreads.com. No need to pretend to read it, just read it.

    Oh, and by the way, apparently most people have only read 26 books of the 100 books suggested by the BBC… where do you stand?

    7

    War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

    This is one of those books that you’ve probably tried. You’ve read a page or two, and it didn’t sink in. So, you reread those pages. Maybe you thought you weren’t ready, put the book away and tried again in a few months.

    Who knows? We don’t know your reasons… but we do know that it’s a tough read. It’s 1,225 pages long and it’s not easy to get into… BUT once you’re in, you’re in.

    The Guardian wrote a guide on reading the novel, and asked, “Who is the hero? Can you skip the boring bits? How long will it take to read? A guide to a book that is not just great, it is the best novel ever written…”

    Enough to get you to start reading? We hope so!

    8

    Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

    Now this is a real classic. Often with classics, because we’ve heard about them so often, we just assume we have read them somewhere along the line.

    However, when you start reading the book “again” you realize that you actually haven’t read it.

    One of the intriguing things about this book is that a lot of the plot were real situations that the author, Charlotte Bronte had experienced herself.

    If the thought of all this reading is making you tired, remember you can always turn to Audible. And we’ve got a free download waiting for you. To claim yours, head to alux.com/freebook.

    9

    Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

    Aluxers, don’t knock the classics. Although this book was released in 1883… and yes, the language is a little ‘old-fashioned’ – it’s a great read. This is where we developed our perception of pirates, that still holds true today.

    This book has been adapted so many times. The first time was back in 1918 when it was released as a silent film and of late, in the finale of season 3 of The Handmaid’s Tale, Commander Lawrence reads part of the book to a few runaway children.

    If a book can stand the test of time for so many decades, it must be a real page turner.

    10

    The Invitation by Oriah Mountain Dreamer

    You’ve probably received a copy of this book somewhere along your journey and accepted it but silently rolled your eyes.

    It was originally written as a prose poem, with the most well-known verse being:

    “It doesn’t interest me

    what you do for a living.

    I want to know

    what you ache for

    and if you dare to dream

    of meeting your heart’s longing.”

    Much like the Alchemist, this book speaks a lot about our relationship with the universe.

    And granted, you may not be ready for the read just yet, but keep your copy that you were gifted – because it truly is a gift.

    11

    The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger

    Depression, sex, belonging, identity, loss, connection, innocence… themes that are all relevant today and themes that were equally relevant in 1951 when this novel was released.

    This book caused its fair share of controversy. In 1960, a teacher from Oklahoma was fired for assigning the book to her class. It was the most censored book in high school between 1961 and 1982 as well as the second-most taught book in public schools.

    Several shootings have been associated with the book, including Mark David Chapman – the guy who killed John Lennon. He bought a copy of the book the day he killed Lennon and was arrested with the book.

    Now that your interest is piqued, get a copy and find out why it was such a cause for controversy yourself.

    12

    Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden

    You’ve probably watched the film, and now it’s time to read the novel. Add this one to your TBR list – in case you don’t suffer from bibliophilism, that means to be read.

    With over 750,000 5-star ratings on Good Read, this book comes highly recommended.  

    And here’s the thing about this book Aluxers, it’s a quick read. Bonus. So, you can stop pretending to have read it and just do it.

    On a side note – a real geisha, Mineko Iwasaki, sued Arthur Golden for defamation. She had shared stories of people to Golden, privately, and was horrified to read that many characters were based on real people she had shared with him.

    Since we are talking about books today, don’t forget to check out 15 Powerful Books to Change Your View on Life.

    13

    Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    “The man who has a conscience suffers whilst acknowledging his sin. That is his punishment.”

    A quote from the novel published in 1866.

    In its most basic form, the book tells of the plight of a young student who has run out of money. He decides to murder a pawnbroker to whom he has sold everything he owns. He tells himself the murder will be good, because he will use the money he steals and help others too… and as you can imagine, his mind is a wreck, and he struggles to continue as before.

    The book really delves into your psyche, and makes you look at yourself in a different light too.

    14

    Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

    It’s not as long as War and Peace, but almost. It’s got 1037 pages and is Margaret Mitchell’s “one hit wonder.” It was the only book she ever published, and it was a huge success. A Harris Poll found that Gone with the Wind was the second favourite book of most Americans, just behind The Bible. 

    So, the question remains Aluxers… have you read the book?

    15

    Ulysses by James Joyce

    A whole book centred around the events of just one day… that’s this one. Often described as the greatest book of all time, or the greatest novel of the century… but only by those that have read it.

    The book has been censored, encountered legal action and caused controversy… and you haven’t read it… yet.

    Aluxers, if you’re keen to up your reading game, we suggest you also watch our video:

    Question:

    Aluxers, which of these books have you honestly read, and which was your favourite? We’d love your feedback!

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